0

Pan-seared Marinated Beef with Pouched Egg

Have anyone of you had watched the Canadian Chef Micheal Smith cooking show? Specifically the Chef at Home cooking show? I really really look up to him, he is a very inspiring person and one of his many infamous quotes is “My secret recipe is cooking without a recipe”. That quote is truly one of my most favorite quotes EVER. He is  a good cook (not just good but extremely good cook) and he is not afraid of trying and tasting new ingredients, pushing himself way from his comfort zone.

Chef Michael Dixon Smith is one of my most favorite chefs of all time. He is a very well-organized person and certainly a very good cook. He had once said "I've cooked for queens and kings, but the greatest critique I've ever had is my own son" lol

Chef Michael Dixon Smith is one of my most favorite chefs of all time. He is a very well-organized person and certainly a very good cook. He had once said “I’ve cooked for presidents and even for queens and kings, but the greatest critique I’ve ever had is my own son” lol

Cooking without a recipe is to be fair very challenging, but what this guy is trying to share is do not afraid of using new ingredients, go for it, play around in your kitchen and you’ll be inspired with the result! I’ve been trying to be just like him, familiarizing with different kind of ingredients, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t, but who cares, we are having so much fun in the kitchen isn’t? So this recipe came to me by an accident; it was during holiday season when I was really (like REALLY) hungry and so lazy to go outside to buy a dinner for me so instead, I went to my kitchen and found out “There are a lot of stuffs here”. I have a cut of beef (not sure which part), eggs, teriyaki sauce and bonito flakes in my fridge. So I’ve started to experiment cooking a new recipe and voila! It actually worked! So here are my ingredients:

  1. 100-200kg of beef, thinly sliced –any tender cut like sirloin or tenderloin will do (100-200g of beef)
  2. An egg (sebiji telur)
  3. An onion, cut into juliene pieces (bawang besar dipotong halus)
  4. 100g of plain unsalted butter (100g mentega)
  5. Teriyaki sauce (sos teriyaki)
  6. Soy sauce (kicap manis)
  7. 1 teaspoon of vinegar (sesudu besar cuka)
  8. 1 tablespoon of brown sugar (sesudu besar gula perang)
  9. Bonito flakes (emping Bonito) –optional
  10. Green onion, finely sliced (daun bawang diracik halus) –for garnish
  11. Salt and pepper to taste (garam dan lada sulah secukup rasa)

Instructions

  1. Marinate your beef with teriyaki sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar and few touches of salt and pepper. Let it marinates for about half an hour. Fire up your pan into medium heat and few dashes of cooking oil. When the oil is hot enough, you can start to sear up your beef. When cook, let the beef rest
  2. To make the most perfect pouched egg, you’ll need to have a very fresh egg; fresh egg has intact membrane that allows the egg to remain in a good shape during pouching. It is important too to add vinegar into the boiling water to help the egg white to congeal easier. Crack down your egg into a cup. First bring water in a saucepan to almost boiling. If the water is already boiling, lower the heat until it is no longer boiling. Then add your vinegar and gently drop the egg into the water. With a spoon, nudge the egg whites closer to their yolks. This will help the egg whites hold together. At this point, turn off the heat and put your lid on. Let it for about 4 minutes to let the egg cooks. Remove the egg gently from the pan using a spatula.
  3. Fire up you pan under medium with a splash of cooking oil and butter, throw in your onion and let it cook for about 5 minutes until it softens and caramelizes.
  4. Pile up your beef on the plate, sprinkle a few bits of Bonito flakes on top with your caramelized unions. Gently put your pouched egg on top and sprinkle a pinch of pepper and chopped green onion on top of it.

I’m not afraid of doing mistakes in cooking; having multiple flaws and mistakes in the past really have sharpened my ability in cooking and tasting. To be fair, I’m not a good cook at the start (not saying I’m a good cook now either), I often cooked burnt stuffs like overcooked chickens, over-seasoned my foods and baking cake too long turning it into biscuit; but at the end of the day; who cares! As far as I’ve enjoyed my time and I’ve learnt through my mistakes, its enough for me to feel contented more than I’ve could possibly ask and most importantly it makes me happy. That’s the thing about life, go out there, try new things, explore, and don’t afraid of making mistakes cause life is just too short to hold yourself back! Have a try! =)

This dish is invented out of surprise, and I love and enjoy every bite of it. Noted that oozing egg is certainly the best sign of a perfectly pouched egg

This dish is invented out of surprise, and I love and enjoy every bite of it. The oozing egg is certainly the best sign of a perfectly pouched egg

0

Laksa Johor

My dad is a government servant and because of that we’ve moving a lot my whole life. We’re literally have been transferring to almost every southern states of Malaysian Peninsular. One of the states that we’ve once lived was Johor; it is the southernmost part of Malaysian Peninsular. We’ve been living there for 9-10 years and I have a lot (I meant A LOT) of fun mixing and adjusting myself with my fellow Johorean friends. Johorean cuisine is well-known for it’s adaptability towards various kinds of influences (mainly Javanese, Bajau and lot more) as huge number of Johoreans are descendants of these ethnic groups. Mixed blend of spices and vibrant ingredients made Johorean food stood up on it’s own class. One of my most favorite and highly celebrated Johorean cuisines is Laksa Johor.

Laksa Johor is basically a noodle dish which apparent enough to be totally different from other kind of laksa found across Malaysia because of the use of spaghetti instead of thick starchy rice noodle that is staple in most of other laksas. It is basically a unique Malay version of the Italian classic spaghetti. The sauce is rich, spicy and it often been served with fresh veggies and sambal belacan as a prominent and common condiment. This recipe has been handed down to me by my beloved aunt (she was our very close neighbor when we lived in Muar) and I couldn’t had enough ever since!

Ingredients

Main

  1. 2 packets of spaghetti (2 paket spaghetti)
  2. 300g of Indian Mackerel (300g ikan kembung)
  3. 1kg of Wolf Herring (1kg ikan parang) –>this is best grilled, but it’s just fine to use the fresh ones
  4. 2 liters of coconut milk (2 liter santan)
  5. 100g of dried Mullet fish, pounded into paste (100g ikan kurau kering, ditumbuk halus)
  6. 1-2 small packets of curry powder (1-2 paket kecil serbuk kasi)
  7. 4 tablespoons of cumin powder (4 sudu besar serbuk jintan putih)
  8. 4 tablespoons of coriander seed powder (4 sudu besar serbuk biji ketumbar)
  9. 1 cup of toasted, desiccated coconut flesh (secawan kerisik)
  10. I cup of Tamarind juice (secawan jus asam jawa)
  11. 15 laksa leaves/ Vietnamese mint, finely chop (15 helai daun laksa/ daun kesum dipotong halus)
  12. 2 gingertorches, finely chop (2 tangkai bunga kantan)
  13. Salt and sugar for seasonings (garam dan gula secukup rasa)

Spice blends (Laksa paste)

  1.  3cm of galangal (3cm lengkuas)
  2. 2cm of fresh ginger (2cm halia muda)
  3. 8 lemongrass, sliced (8 batang serai diracik)
  4. 5 cloves of garlic (5 ulas bawang putih)
  5. 1/2 cup of dried shrimps, soaked in cold water and strained (1/2 cawan udang kering direndam serta ditos)
  6.  3cm of fresh tumeric root (3cm kunyit hidup)
  7. 30 dried chilies, boiled and remove the seeds (30 cili kering direbus dan dibuang cili)
  8. 2 teaspoons of roasted shrimp paste (2 sudu kecil belacan bakar)
  9. 25 shallots (25 biji bawang merah)

Instructions

  1. Throw in your fishes (indian mackerel and wolf herring) into your pot and pour in enough water to immerse the fishes. Put the pot into medium heat and let it boils for 20-30 minutes. When the fishes are flaky and yummy, remove from heat and remove the fishes, BUT don’t throw away the fish stock, save it for later use.
  2. Flake out all of those beautifully boiled fishes and set them aside.
  3. You can start blending your spices. Put in all of the spice blends into your food processor with a cup of fish stock that you’ve made earlier. Blend them all together to form a fine paste.
  4. Now you can start firing up your pot with generous dashes of cooking oil. When the oil is hot enough, pour in your laksa paste into the pot and fry till fragrant .
  5. After that, add in the flaked fishes, coconut milk, dried mullet fish and  and the remaining of the fish stock. Let it simmers for a while and after that add in the curry, cumin and coriander seed powder, laksa leaves, gingertorch, kerisik and tamarind juice into the pot. Salt and sugar to taste. Bring it down to simmer for 20 minutes until the gravy thickens and yummy and delicious and out of the world.
  6. Cook your spaghetti and pour your laksa gravy on top of your spaghetti and VOILA! Laksa johor is served!!

Laksa Johor is often been served with fresh veggies for example cucumber, long beans and bean sprouts together with sambal belacan. It is heavenly beautiful dish, and you should get cookin’! Try one, you’ll be mesmerized!

Laksa Johor served with freshly choped long beans, fried tofu and sambal belacan

Laksa Johor served with freshly choped long beans, fried tofu and sambal belacan

0

Nasi Lemak

Nasi lemak is considered to be the crown jewel of Malaysian cuisine. It is adored by everyone in this multi-cultural country; just to say that each and everyone of us have their own twist in making this scrumptious dish. Chinese has their own way of cooking it, even Indians too have their own spin to it. Originally, this is a Malay dish. It is a very versatile dish, as it can be literally served with all other Malay dishes on the menu.

Foods are meant to be share. In old times, people ate nasi lemak together in a tray shared with 3-4 people. It is where love and friendship nurtured. Some people in Malaysia still practicing eating foods in a tray.

Foods are meant to be shared. In old times, people ate nasi lemak together in a tray shared with 3-4 people. It was where love and friendship nurtured. Some people in Malaysia still practicing eating foods in a tray.

A plain nasi lemak consists of a fragrant rice (cooked in coconut milk and other aromatic spices) with fried anchovies, fried peanuts and cucumber together with sambal (chili paste) as a condiment. Nasi lemak also shares the same recipe in its neighboring country like Indonesia (called as nasi uduk) and Singapore. In this entry, I will share with you my mother recipe in making the authentic Nasi Lemak.

Ingredients

Nasi Lemak

  1. 500g of rice (500g beras)
  2. 2 inches of ginger, crushed (2 inci halia ditumbuk)
  3. 3 pandan leaves (3 helai daun pandan)
  4. 3 1/2 cup of coconut milk (3 1/2 cawan santan) –> you don’t have to be super precise, the coconut milk should be enough to cover 2 inches above the level of your rice
  5. salt for seasoning (garam secukup rasa)

Sambal (chili paste)

  1. 125g of dried anchovies (125g ikan bilis)
  2. 7 shallots (7 bawang merah)
  3. 6-7 dried chilies, boiled and remove the seeds (6-7 tangkai cili kering, direbus dan dibuang biji)
  4. 5cm of toasted shrimp paste (5cm belacan bakar)
  5. 1 cup of coconut milk (secawan santan)
  6. 3/4 cup of tamarind juice (3/4 jus asam jawa)
  7. Salt for seasoning (garam secukup rasa)

Garnishes

  1. 1 hard boiled egg, cut into half (sebiji telur rebus dipotong dua)
  2. 3-4 slices of cucumber (3-4 potong timun)
  3. 90g of fried peanuts, peeled (kacang tanah goreng, dibuang kulit)
  4. 90g of fried anchovies (ikan bilis goreng)

Instructions

Making the nasi lemak

  1. Make sure that you’ve cleaned your rice thoroughly before cooking, the last thing you want to taste is chalky rice. Throw in every single ingredients into your pot and season the the rice. Let the rice cook under gentle heat (if you’re using a rice cooker it is even more easier) until the rice softens and tender. The rice should be ready when the you couldn’t see any remaining liquid inside your pot (the rice will absorb every little bit of coconut you’ve put).
  2. Let it rest

Making the sambal

  1. Under medium heat and generous amount of cooking oil, fry up your dried anchovies until crisp and golden in color.
  2. Throw in all of the ingredients (except the dried anchovies) into your food processor to blend it together to produce a fine chili paste.
  3. Then, fire up your pan under medium heat with generous splashes of cooking oil. When the oil is hot enough, throw in your paste into the pan, and saute the paste for about 5 minutes. When your sambal has been cooked, throw in your fried anchovies into the pan and mix them well together with the sambal.

Now that your fundamental ingredients have been prepared, you can start to assemble the dish as creative as you wish, using the garnishes I’ve mentioned before. You can serve this dish with various kind of other Malay dishes, but  the most popular combination is rendang. Have a try, really! This dish has hooked million of tourists who have been to Malaysia =)

Traditional nasi lemak with sambal, fried peanuts and anchovies, chicken rendang, cucumber and hard boiled egg

Traditional nasi lemak with sambal, fried peanuts and anchovies, chicken rendang, cucumber and hard boiled egg

0

Rendang Ayam Negeri Sembilan

For hundreds of years, Malay people has been foraging the natural goodness from their millions years old forest and came out with various kind of useful herbs and spices. Foraged herbs not only use for medical practices but some of them have been used in foods and drinks. Malay foods are synonymous with multiple usage of herbs, spices and above of all, the cuisine is best known for its richness and heartiness. The usage of coconut is eminent in most of its cuisine and can be found in all sorts of cooking like rendang, gulai and nasi lemak. Some of the herbs used in Malay cuisine can’t be found anywhere else in the WORLD *proud tone. One of them is “daun puding” (Grapthophyllum hortense). I don’t know what it is called in English, cause certainly it is not pudding leaf as if you translated the word using Mr Google (I looove Mr Google). Daun puding is a leaf from a tree that can be found ubiquitously across Malaysia, but apparently some of us don’t even know that the tree was called Pokok Puding Hitam.

Puding tree (Grapthophyllum hortense) is a tree that can be found easily in Malaysia and often been used in Negeri Sembilan cooking. It is basically tasteless but it certainly has an ethereal aroma

Puding tree (Grapthophyllum hortense) is a tree that can be found easily in Malaysia and often been used in Negeri Sembilan cooking. It is basically tasteless but it certainly has an ethereal aroma

 

Malays especially the ones that live in Negeri Sembilan (one of many other states in Malaysia) grow Puding tree in their backyards. The leaf of the tree is often used in their cooking especially rendang ayam ( chicken stew) and is known by locals for its mild laxative property. Daun puding is basically quite tasteless but it has this kind of hearty and calming aroma that make it suitable for Negeri Sembilan cooking (Malay people love aromatics in their cooking). My late granma made THE most delicious rendang ayam negeri sembilan EVER, and I learned this recipe from the best. Rendang Ayam Negeri Sembilan is basically a chicken stew that is cooked in coconut milk with spice blend consist of various kind of herbs and aromatics; making this dish to be as unique as it sounds. Rendang is a traditional Malay dish, prepared by millions of households (probably some of them are preparing their beloved rendang now as we speak lol) across Malaysia, but Rendang Ayam Negeri Sembilan is exceptionally different because of the use of distinctive secret ingredients (which will no longer be a secret as we speak now lol) that I’m about to revealed. Yeay!

 

Ingredients

Main Ingredients

  1. A whole chicken, cut into smaller pieces and clean (seekor ayam dipotong kecil dan dibersihkan)
  2. 6-7 puding leaves (6-7 helai daun puding)
  3. 3 kaffir lime leaves (3 helai daun limau purut)
  4. 1 tumeric leaf (sehelai daun kunyit)
  5. 100-200g of grated coconut flesh (100-200g kerisik)
  6. 1 liter of freshly squeezed coconut milk (1 liter santan segar)
  7. Salt and sugar for seasonings (garam dan gula secukup rasa)

Spice Blends

  1. 1 inch of fresh ginger (seinci halia muda)
  2. 2 inches of galangga (2inci lengkuas)
  3. 10 shallots (10 biji bawang merah)
  4. 4 cloves of garlic (4 ulas bawang putih)
  5. 2 inches of fresh tumeric root (2 inci kunyit hidup)
  6. 25 bird’s eyes chilies (10 tangkai cili padi) –> you can lessen this if you can’t stand spicy food
  7. 10 dried chili, soaked and boild, remove the seeds (10 tangkai cili kering, direbus dan dibuang biji)
  8. 8 lemon grasses (8 tangkai serai)
  9. 4-5 dried candlenuts (4-5 biji buah keras) –> this is my granma secret blend

Instructions

  1. First of all, we have to start toasting the grated coconut flesh to make “kerisik”. You need to fire up your pan under medium heat WITHOUT any oil, toast the grated coconut flesh until it browns (the aroma coming out from this process is out of the world,boy that’s why I LOVE cooking’!). Put them aside to rest
  2. Now its time to prepare the spice blend. Blend all of the spices into a very fine paste together with half of the toasted grated coconut flesh. Add a little bit of water to ease the blending process.
  3. Use half of the spice blend to marinate your chicken. Let it rest for half an hour for the chicken to marry together with your delicious aromatic spice blend. Another half of the spice blend you can start to saute in your pot until it turns fragrant.
  4. Once the spice blend has been sauteed, put your marinated chicken into the pot and let it cook for about 3-4 minutes. Stir accordingly.
  5. Then you can pour in your fresh coconut milk and bring it to simmer under gentle heat (NEVER cook coconut milk under high heat, it will certainly curdle and curd isn’t good at all). Together with that, you can throw in the kaffir lime leaves and turmeric leaves. You can start to season your dish with salt and sugar this time forward
  6. Let the stew cook for an hour with your lid on. When the stew starts to thicken (this stew should be dry, you should have a stew that can hardly has any gravy anymore), throw in the puding leaves and let it cooks for another 5-6 minutes.
  7. Now your Rendang Ayam Negeri Sembilan is done!!

This dish is best served with warm plain rice or nasi lemak. Old folks love to eat it with salted fish and sambal belacan. For me, it is best enjoy with any kind of sambal and remember this is a very hearty and rich dish, so if you are care about your waistline, eat it in a small amount. Have a try! Your be lovin’ it

Rendang ayam Negeri Sembilan served with rice, sambal belacan and veggies

Rendang ayam Negeri Sembilan served with rice, sambal belacan and veggies

0

Deconstructed Okonomiyaki

こんにちは!! Hi guys! We meet again (AGAIN). Okay today i would like to have my inner Japanese spirit shines through *meditating. I love everything about Japanese – their anime, manga, Jpop drama and musics, their FOODSSS, kimono, and all sorts of that. Japanese people are known for their microscopic precision in doing things, it’s well projected in their products all over the globe. Their precision and love for perfection very well portrayed in their culture including their foods.

Japanese foods are like no other. Their respect towards the ingredients and the process are extremely honorable; making Japanese food to be one of the most sought after foods on the planet. Japanese foods are about super quality, super precision and super fresh ingredient; it can be clearly seen through the precise cut of sashimi, the freshness of sushi and on top of that the top-notch quality behind preparing all those scrumptious cuisines. This is one of many Japanese foods of my favorite, and this recipe was handed down to me by my foster Japanese dad; Mr Otani aka Otoosan when I was doing my exchange student program at the age of 16 in Nagoya. It was quite a long ago, but I’ve kept my those beautiful memories of living in Japan by keeping the recipe alive.

Basically this Okonomiyaki recipe is a deconstructed version of the original Okonomiyaki. It certainly doesn’t look like the normal pancake-like that you used to see, but believe me it is as good as the original. Hey, it doesn’t hurt to put some attitude to your cooking skill isn’t it =D

My very own deconstructed okonomiyaki, inspired from my foster Japanese dad's recipe. Hell good!

My very own deconstructed okonomiyaki, inspired from my foster Japanese dad’s recipe. Hell good!

Here is the list of ingredients that you need:

Okonomiyaki Flour/ batter

  1. I cup (100g) normal all purpose flour, you can use Okonomiyaki flour if you can find one (secawan tepung serba guna)
  2. I cup chicken stock (secawan stok pati ayam)
  3. 2 eggs (2 biji telur)
  4. 2 stalks green onion, chop finely (2 batang daun bawang)
  5. 30g of Umezu/pickled ginger (30g jeruk halia)
  6. Salt and pepper for seasonings (garam dan lada hitam secukup rasa)

Toppings

  1. Deboned chicken thigh cut into smaller pieces (Peha ayam dibuang tulang, dipotong kecil)
  2. Takiyaki soy sauce/ Japanese light soy sauce (kicap jepun/ kicap cair)
  3. Katsuobushi (Bonito Flakes) –> can be easily found at any Japanese cuisine specialty shop
  4. Juliene cut shallots and parsley (bawag merah dan daun pasli diracik halus)
  5. Kewpie mayo with a dash of tomato ketchup (mayonis Kewpie dengan sedikit sos tomato)

Instructions

Preparing the batter

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the all purpose flour and water until smooth. Whisk appropriately to avoid any lump. Lump is hideous and taste horrendous 
  2. Add the eggs, green onions and pickled ginger and mix them together. Just mix it lightly, don’t be crazy mixing this time. Be gentle okay, I know you guys are super-excited lol
  3. Then, using a non-stick pan, put on medium heat until the pan is hot enough, pour in the batter. Using your cooking spatula, flatten the batter into your desirable thickness (me is 3.5 cm approx) and let it cook at about 5-6 minutes.Then flip it over when the bottom has started to turn brown and cook the other side for another 2-3 minutes.
  4. You batter is now ready!

Preparing the Toppings

  1. Use the boneless chicken thigh and marinate them with japanese soy sauce with a tough of pepper and salt. Let it be for half an hour
  2. Fire up your non stick frying pan on a medium heat and splash some cooking oil. Fry the chicken thigh until it becomes deliciously caramel in color and set aside
  3. Let them rest

Now you can start to assemble all of them. Spread the Kewpie with tomato ketchup on top of the batter then put the cooked marinated chicken thigh on top of your batter and sprinkled some of that bonito flakes and juliene cut shallots and green onion. Now, your Deconstructed Okonomiyaki is served! Give it a try, you be lovin’ it!  ありがとう!!!

My beloved foster Japanese dad, Mr Yoshihiro Otani. Love you dad! =)

My beloved foster Japanese dad, Mr Yoshihiro Otani. Love you dad! circa 2005=)

0

Nasi Ayam (Chicken Rice)

This post is really personal to me. Y’know why? Cause this recipe was given to me by my beloved aunt. She was like a cook diva, she was a fusion cook extraordinaire, she really knew what she was doing, and her cooking; gosh out of this world! I’ll miss her a lot! Okay, today post is about the celebration of chicken. Who doesn’t love chicken? If you are a chicken skeptic, there’s something wrong with you somewhere or somehow lol. Its the all time favorite protein source; this humble double legs creature is all about versatility. The list of chicken recipes go for ages, from chicken parmigiana, chicken pie, chicken rice, chicken cacciotore to chicken salad-we have never had enough of chicken, don’t ya think so?

This is my beloved aunt. Aunt Yasmin. She was the one who has taught me preparing chicken rice, and she inspired me a lot in becoming a good cook. She has passed away earlier this year due to status asthmaticus at the age of 41 (life threatening asthmatic condition) Have a good rest aunty, may god bless you always

This is my beloved aunt. Aunt Yasmin. She was the one who taught me preparing chicken rice, and she inspired me a lot in becoming a good cook. She has passed away earlier this year due to status asthmaticus at the age of 41 (life threatening asthmatic condition) Have a good rest aunty, may god bless you always

This chicken rice is basically a Chinese dish, it has been introduced to Malaysia by, have a guess –> Chinese immigrants of course. It is a well celebrated dish that has captured the heart of many Malaysians and each of everyone of us has their own secret blend to make the PERFECT chicken rice of their own. This is my own rendition of chicken rice! Have a try!

To get started, you have to know what is chicken rice and what condiments go along with it. So chicken rice basically is a rice dish that is cooked using chicken broth (instead of plain salted water) and it is served with marinated fried chicken with 2 basic condiments which are soy sauce and chilli sauce (we called it “air lada” here, literally means chili water (which sounded super weird as for me lol). So let’s get cookin’!

Ingredients (I’ve divided them into batches so it’s easier to get grip with the whole process)

1st Batch (Chicken broth)

  1. A whole chicken, cut into 4 and clean ( seekor ayam, potong 4 dan bersihkan)
  2. 2 pieces of star anise (2 biji bunga lawang)
  3. 2 sticks of cinnamon (2 batang kayu manis)
  4. 2 pieces of cardamom (2 biji buah pelaga)
  5. A whole big onion, diced up (bawang besar dipotong kecil)
  6. 4 cloves of garlic, mashed into paste ( 4 ulas bawang putih ditumbuh halus)
  7. An inch of ginger (seinci halia)
  8. 2 celery (2 batang saderi) –> i’ts unconventional to put celery, but I’ve found it tastes a lot fresher to have celery in chicken broth. So, this is my own spin
  9. Green onion (daun bawang)
  10. Cilantro (daun ketumbar) –> this one is optional, but I’ve found it tastier to put this one, it tastes a lot more Chinese-sy haha
  11. Salt for seasoning (garam secukup rasa)

2nd Batch (Marinated chicken)

  1. Whole chicken that has been boiled to perfection in the chicken broth lol (ayam yang telah direbus SEMPURNA)
  2. Thin soy sauce (kicap cair)
  3.  Few dashes of oyster sauce (sedikit sos tiram)
  4. A few drops of sesame seed oil — warning!! please be gentle with this oil, it’s potent! haha (beberapa titik minyak bijan)
  5. A tablespoon of brown sugar (sesudu besar gula perang)

3rd Batch (Chicken rice)

  1. 5 cups of rice – any kind that you wish, but better to choose the starchiest one hee (5 cawan beras)
  2. 200 grams of butter (200gram mentega) —> this is y secret ingredient!
  3. An inch of ginger (seinci halia)
  4. 3 cloves of garlic (3 ulas bawang putih)
  5. 2 shallots, diced up (2 bawang merah)
  6. One lemon grass, whacked to release its fragrance (sebatang serai dititik)
  7. 2 pandan leaves for fragrance (2 helai daun pandan untuk wangian)
  8. Chicken broth made earlier (air rebusan ayam yang telah dibuat awal)

4th Batch (Chili sauce/ air lada)

  1. 5 red chilies (5 biji cili merah)
  2. 4 cloves of garlic (4 ulas bawang putih)
  3. 2 inches of ginger (2 inci halia)
  4. A teaspoon of vinegar (1 sudu teh cuka)
  5. A teaspoon of sesame seed oil (1 sudu minyak bijan)
  6. 1/2 cup of chicken broth made earlier (1/2 cawan air rebusan ayam yang telah dibuat awal)
  7. Sugar and salt for seasonings (gula dan garam secukupnya)

5th Batch (Soy sauce)

  1. Thin soy sauce (kicap cair)
  2. 1 tablespoon of brown sugar (sesudu gula perang)
  3. Some of the chicken broth made earlier (sedikit air rebusan ayam)

Instructions

Chicken Broth

  1. Have a pot put under medium heat and when the pot is hot enough put few splashes of cooking oil. Put the garlic, onion, ginger, celery, and all of the spices into the pot and saute until it becomes fragrant and the onion started to caramelize.
  2. After that, put the chicken into the pot and pour in water just enough to cover the whole chicken. Bring it to simmer
  3. Approximately 20-30 minutes later you can start remove the chicken (you don’t want to boil the chicken too long, the last thing you ever want is to have a dried chicken on your menu). Season the broth with salt accordingly
  4. Put the broth on a gentle low heat, so that you can keep the broth warm for later use

Marinating the Chicken, and Frying up the Pan

  1. After removing the chicken, you can start to marinate the chicken with the 2nd batch ingredient.
  2. Marinate the chicken for at least half an hour, best 1 to 2 hours
  3. When the chicken has been marinated, fire the stove on medium heat, put your frying pan with generous amount of oil for frying.
  4. Start frying the chicken with the skin on the bottom side (this will ensure a crusty delicious skin that we’ve been dreaming all day long). Another technique I’ve learnt; when you fry the chicken, pour some of the hot oil on top of the chicken, this will make a glistening crusty skin when you’ve finished frying them.
  5. Remember, NEVER fry the chicken too long, you just want crisp the skin up, knowing the fact that the chicken itself has been boiled earlier. So you don’t have to worry whether the chicken cooked thoroughly or not.
  6. Let it rest. (Fun fact – resting a meat after cooking is crucial, cause when you cut any kind of protein immediately after cooking, the natural juice will run down and you’ll end up having a dry piece of meat. So remember, let it rest!)

Preparing the Chicken Rice

  1. Heat up your rice cooker, and put in some butter. As the butter melted, throw in the ginger, lemon grass, shallots, garlic and pandan leaves into the pot. Saute the ingredients until fragrant.
  2. After that, put in the rice and mix well with the sauteed ingredients
  3. Pour in some of the chicken broth made earlier just enough to cover 2 inches above the rice.
  4. Cook until the rice softens

Chili Sauce

  1. Put in all of the 4th batch ingredients into your blender, blend until it produces super smooth sauce
  2. You can cook the sauce on gentle heat but I’d rather leave it raw

I really (like REALLY) recommend you guys to give this a try. It seems to be quite difficult (I can’t deny on that), but believe once you’ve tried, you’ll be dancing on your table (while munching, gosh it’s horrible!). Spread the looooovee

Chicken rice with soy and chili sauce as condiments . Give it a try!

Chicken rice with soy and chili sauce as condiments . Give it a try!

0

Ayam Masak Lemak Cili Padi

Masak lemak cili padi is a super spicy and super rich yellow coconut gravy cooked with bird’s eyes chilies (considered to be one of the hottest chilies on the planet, just after Habanero, 50k to 100k in Scoville units). This is a Negeri Sembilan specialty and often being served during festivities like wedding or some households cook it in a regular daily basis. I’ve been told that this is a meal fit for a king cause in ancient time, masak lemak cili padi only served to royalties and nobles. This recipe has been passed down from generation and it’s authenticity has been well-preserved until now. They said anyone in Malaysia can cook this dish, but it takes a pure Negeri Sembilan soul to make this dish to be exceptionally delightful, but dont buy to it, just give it a shot!

The rich and spicy ayam masak lemak cili padi

The rich and spicy ayam masak lemak cili padi

Main ingredients:

  1. One whole chicken cut into pieces and clean (seekor ayam, potong kecil, bersihkan)
  2. 3-4 potatoes cut in to wedges and immerse into lukewarm water (3-4 biji kentang dipotong baji dan rendamkan dalam air suam)
  3. 3 lemon grasses and wacked to release its natural oil (3 batang serai dititik)
  4. 2 pieces of asam keping/dired tamarind slice (2 keping asam keping)
  5. 2 pieces of tumeric leaves as fragrance, finely chop into julienne cut ; optional (2 helai daun kunyit, pilihan)
  6. 800ml of thin coconut milk (800ml santan cair)
  7. 400ml of condensed coconut milk (400ml pati santan)
  8. salt and sugar for seasoning

Spice blend:

  1. 20 bird’s eyes chilies (20 biji/ segenggam cili padi)
  2. One inch of young ginger (seinci halia muda)
  3. One inch of tumeric root (seinci kunyit hidup)
  4. 7 shallots (7 biji bawang merah)
  5. 3-4 cloves of garlic (3-4 biji bawang putih)
  6. Some water (sedikit air)

Instructions:

  1. After finishing blending all of the spices into a fine paste, rub it all over the chicken and let it marinates for at least half an hour. Save some of the spice blend for saute. Saute the remaining spice blend in a pot with a little bit of cooking oil (remember be gentle with the oil, this is a rich dish, so you dont want to add anymore fat in it) on medium heat until fragrant.
  2. Put the marinated chicken into the pot and mix well with the sauteed spice blends. Let it cook for a while until the chicken started to shrink in size, this will take no more than 3-4 minutes.
  3. Pour in the thin and condensed coconut milk and the potatoes into the pot and let it simmer under gentle heat. Add the asam keping along the way
  4. When the gravy started to thicken, add the last bit of tumeric leaves  and let it boil for another 5-10 minutes. Season accordingly with salt and sugar.

This beautiful dish is best serve with any kind of Malay dishes but because of its richness it is well recommended to serve with some salty condiments like sambal belacan, cencaluk or ikan masin (dried salted fish). These condiments can cut through the richness of the dish and bring balance to your pallet. Serve with warm rice and you’ll be amazed of how AMAZING this dish really is. To tell the truth, this is my personal favorite, have a try and you’ll be hooked in no time!

Ayam masak lemak cili padi served with rice, fried cabbage and omelette. Sambal belacan as condiments

Ayam masak lemak cili padi served with rice, fried cabbage and omelette. Sambal belacan as the condiment